MSCs help us Reject Rejection

mesenchymal_stem_cell 2The light of rejection-free, healthy kidney transplants has entered the tunnel, and should arrive at our end in just three to five years.

Last month a senior researcher from the Cell and Tissue Therapies WA at the Royal Perth Hospital (CTTWA) presented a paper to the Renal Society of Australia‘s annual conference that has profound implications for us BigDers.  It detailed their early clinical trial successes in using Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs) to stop kidney transplant rejection and to repair acute kidney injury (among many other medical wonders). (more…)

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Kidney transplants in China – the real story

Two days ago (7 Apr 2015), SBS Dateline broadcast Human Harvest: China’s Organ Trafficking.

Just 24 minutes long, it is a truly shocking story about the source of kidney and other organ transplants, with evidence from the doctors who performed some of the operations.  Organs, including corneas and kidneys brutally removed without anaesthetic from tortured political prisoners, who are then killed and disposed of.

Not just a few transplants either.  (more…)

Every donor kidney a perfect match: no more transplant drugs!

Stem CellsWe all hate rejection.  It hurts us somewhere deep inside.  And those of us who’ve had an organ transplant hate it most of all.  Because the only way to make all that pain go away is by taking a hearty (sometimes heroic) dose of anti-rejection drugs.

Rejection is driven by our body’s immune system, a collection of cells (T cells) that recognise and destroy foreign cells: germs, poisons, other bits that find their way into us. All cells have proteins called antigens on their surface.  As soon as these antigens enter our body, the immune system recognises that they are not from our body and attacks them.

When we receive an organ transplant, our immune system (more…)

How much is a new kidney worth on the Red Market?

Not feeling all that energetic this week (same as the last couple).  For some reason my haemoglobin is still hanging loose at a miserable 8.2.  That is transfusion level, but because I’m on the transplant list, transfusions are off the agenda.  Someone else’s blood may introduce more antibodies than I can handle, and move me from a 2% likelihood of a transplant to a big fat zero.

So I am biding my time, taking my weekly EPO dose and hoping for a surprise energy burst anytime now…   In the meantime, my gym is sending me “Where are you?” messages and I’m breaking ito a sweat jogging from the kitchen to the bathroom.  Though with the daily HB blood tests removing a little of what blood I have, I may be running in a circle. (more…)

I’m a HemoDialysis Ghost

Now for something completely different, from googleMWgalaxy42.com, dated 29 June 2019.

I’m a Hemo Dialysis Ghost and I’m OK

A couple of weeks ago the bosses at the HDGhosts.com asked us to write a review of our job for their recruitment website (for money!).  Here’s my review.

I’m getting ready for my fifth session as a HD Ghost.  So far it’s been an OK  job.  Not exactly hard work, though it does take a day or two until you feel well again after each session.  But the pay is pretty good, and since it’s the first real job I’ve ever had, and I’m 28, and my dad has never had a job, I’ll stick at it for a while yet. (more…)

From Dialysis to Transplant: Rosy gets a new Kidney

If you are wondering what having a transplant is really like, wonder no longer.  Long-time dialysis blogger and waiting list veteran, Rosy Edwards had the call from Guy’s Hospital in London about two weeks ago.

Over the next two weeks Rosy shared her highs and lows, her fears and exhilarations on her blog.  It’s a wonderful and unique record of the transplant roller coaster ride.  One that is not often told; firstly because few people are as eloquent as Rosy at capturing the moment; and secondly because it is told as it happens, not after the event, when the tough bits have faded from memory.

If, like me you have been through the transplant experience, it will bring back all the memories and emotions, and maybe a little flush of joy for Rosy and all the other successful transplant miracles.

If you are lining up for your first, and wonder a transplant is really like, stop by Rosy’s blog for a reality check.  The take-home message? It can be a tough gig, but most of the time, it’s worth it.

Start here:

The phone rings: Part I

Then here:

The phone rings: Part II

And finally, here:

The phone rings Part III: The Final Chapter

Crowdsourcing Dialysis Poetry

Now for something completely different.

Just for fun, if you haven’t already seen it, have a look at this:

Dumb Ways to Die is a multi-award-winning public service announcement campaign by Metro Trains in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia to promote rail safety. (more…)

Struck by Lightning on Dialysis

We had a joyful occasion about a month ago:  our only daughter Kathy had a baby girl.  Since Julie was a midwife, she was there with Kathy’s husband, throughout the birth.  Kathy had her baby at the Mercy Hospital Family Birth Centre, which was just wonderful.

I wasn’t invited to that particular party (and that was fine with me), so I waited most of the time in the Centre’s appropriately named Waiting Room.  Kathy started proceedings at home and went to the Family Birth Centre after about 16 hours.  She was admitted at about 9pm and had the baby at around 3pm the next day: a long labor (and lots of waiting). (more…)

The Big(D) questions: How to keep going; PD, HD or a transplant?

Last week was a big week for questions, and rather than answering them in the Comments area, it seems like a good idea to discuss some in a post.

First, Dan wrote:

Hi Greg, I’m 30 years old and I have PKD, I’ve had a transplant which unfortunately failed in January 2012. I spent a few months training to do haemo myself so I could do it at home (thinking that would make it much better) how wrong I was!  I’m not sure if it’s my age and the need to stay active but dialysis is driving me mad! I get very fidgety and agitated especially when I’m on the machine and sometimes I get so angry when I’m on there I just want to smash the bloody thing up! (more…)

Dialysis needling: if at first…

 

Buttonholes

Buttonholes!

Josie (not her real name) emailed me recently about a problem she had getting one of her needles in:

 

Hi Greg

I hope you don’t mind me getting in touch. My name is Josie, I live in the UK and started home haemo a few months ago. I have had a problem with my fistula tonight and because it is Friday night here I can’t get hold of any of the nurses from my training unit, and having followed your blog I thought I could seek your advice… as I say, I hope you don’t mind me doing so. (more…)