Life 2.0 – a chance to fix the faulty bits?

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Rebuilding DNA with CRISPR. Source: New Yorker, Illustration by Todd St.John

BIG things are happening in genetics, for BigD-ers and for the rest of the world. Scientists have discovered a naturally-occurring, highly accurate gene editor, that can be used to cut and paste or delete genes or parts of genes in DNA. They can use the editor to remove a disease-causing mutation, replace faulty or undesirable parts of a gene or to turn a gene off completely.

What could this mean? Say you’ve inherited a genetic mutation that guarantees you’ll get polycystic kidney disease by the time you reach adulthood. And that it is most likely you will spend the rest of your life on dialysis.

What if the mutant genes that cause polycystic disease, passed down from generation to generation, can be clipped out of your genome entirely and you never pass it on to any of your offspring? (more…)

Kidney disease: meant-to-be or dumb luck? Part 2 – DNA

DNAOne of the (many) cool and wondrous benefits of being alive in the 21st Century is our ability to look deeply into our own bodies, right down to the very building blocks of life, our DNA, to glimpse our personal program for life.  Another almost-as-amazing benefit is that it costs just $99!

I was keen to check it out to see if my DNA had my kidney failure pre-programmed or if it was just dumb bad luck.

Getting started

I had read quite a bit about 23andMe and had long been keen to see what it had to offer.  So I clicked buy and began my journey. (more…)