A weekend away looking at big art

Tuesday 24 April’s Age newspaper had a story about some new silo art, created just in time for Australia’s Anzac Day on the 25th. It showed two medics, one from the past (WW1 nurse) the other from pretty-well right now (medic working in Afghanistan). They were enormous and looked fabulous.

Julie and I had a free weekend coming up after my early (6:30) dialysis, so we decided we’d go and see them in the flesh (so to speak).

Silo art is relatively new. In Australia, it started in Western Australia in 2015, with the Avon silos in the WA Wheatbelt, a gigantic area north and east of Perth.

Phlegm, CBH Avon grain silos.

Avon Silos

For the uninitiated, the silos I’m talking about are mostly concrete and were built 60-100 years ago to collect grain from the surrounding wheat fields and to load it onto trains that take it to cities or ships for consumption or export. Changes in agriculture, combined with the closure of railway lines, has left hundreds of grain silos in regional Australia abandoned.

These silos have been reused for various community activities, like film projection events, using the concrete silo walls as a screen; cellular or telecommunications towers, or for storage by private companies and farmers.

But by far the most delightful use is for silo art. Since 2015 silos in most states have been painted with a huge variety of artwork, from endangered native animals to real people who live and work in the area.

A quick search on the net shows that Silo Art Tours are becoming very popular, with maps and commentary for most districts. But we wanted to see the latest addition to the collection, not yet on any tour guide, at Devenish, pop. 300, about three hours from Melbourne (and 20 minutes from Benalla).

Art Bonus! When we checked the Benalla website, we discovered that Benalla is a pretty arty city in its own right. Every year since 2015, they hold the Wall to Wall Street Art Festival, where some of the country’s and the world’s best street artists paint the walls of the town and turn it into the street art capital of regional Australia.

Silo art AND street in the same weekend, on one tank of fuel. Sometimes you just get lucky…

So, Saturday morning about 10am, Julie picked me up from dialysis, bright, and perky and full of newly cleaned blood, and off we went. Straight up the Hume Freeway and about 2.5 hrs later we arrived in Benalla and checked in to our motel.

First stop the local bakery for coffee and cake. Excellent. Next, we start the art walk. Fantastic! Here are just a few we found on our rambles.

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World map cow

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Dinner at the local pub and a good night’s sleep. Breakfast at a very nice little café; checkout and we head north to Devenish. But wait, there is also silo art on the way, at Goorambat, a few km south of Devenish.

We arrive at Goorambat and the silos, nestled by the railway, dominate the small town. Two artworks, both endangered species: a river redgum and the barking owl. Very impressive. While we’re looking, a grey nomad from a caravan pulls up. We get to talking. There is more silo art just north of Devenish, at Tungamah. Worth a look while we’re here.

 

1-IMG_E68021-IMG_E6801Now to Devenish, just a few km up the road. Again, the enormous bulk of the silos are visible from quite a distance. At last, we arrive, joining quite a few others. One look at the silos and we realise that the photos we’ve seen don’t do them justice. Rising 20 metres (65 ft) skywards they are huge and beautiful. (And judging from the way the pub is being frequented, they have done wonders for the local economy.)

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The artist, the appropriately named Cam Scale, comes from Melbourne. It took him 11 days to complete both paintings. Amazing.

After coffee and cake at the pub (they have only recently learned how to make it), we set off for Tungamah, 10 km further north.

This time it takes a little searching, but we find it eventually. It’s birds: a huge kookaburra and brolgas dancing in a wheat field. Great to see, but for us, the nurse and medic take the cake.

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By 1pm, we’ve seen all the silo art there is to see around here. Gratified and delighted we turn south and head for home. But this won’t be our last silo art tour!

ps: If you want to see some more beautiful silo art, check out the Australia Post silo art stamp set, due out on 21 May 2018:

Australia Post silos

In memory of Merle, Rest in Peace

Not rehab, reconditioning

The last six months of hospital stays, bleeds, transfusions, infections and heart stuff has left me pretty scrawny and deconditioned – my enormous abs, legs and biceps are but dim shadows of their former selves.

But over the last few weeks, I have turned the corner.

My infection is under control (with horse-size doses of Clindamycin, a yucky-tasting but effective antibiotic. My bleeding and other mysterious blood disappearances have at last come to an end (mostly because I stopped taking the blood thinner Ticagrelor, which was poison to me). My AF is under control, with fairly large doses of Amiodarone. The almost-blockage in my right coronary artery won’t be stented or otherwise operated on (to remove the calcium lump I have patiently built up over years on dialysis). I am taking aspirin daily as a moderately effective blood thinner and maybe that will be enough. So far this has proved to be the case.

So there’s no need to be skinny anymore. At last, I can walk further than around the bed. This morning Julie and I walked about 3km (1.8m) around our block. It was no speed record, but I have been walking regularly now and as long as I don’t try to run up hills, I feel pretty pleased with myself.

legsBut Julie, being Julie, doesn’t think that this is enough, so I went to my local doctor, got a referral to a rehabilitation centre and made an appointment.

Julie and I went along a couple of days ago. The first step is to be assessed by a doctor, who then nominates a plan for reconditioning (yes that’s what its called) over the next 10 weeks. I imagined the assessment would take 5-10 minutes and I’d be outta there. But no, it took 1.5 hours and was the most thorough (and humbling) I’ve had.

It began in a friendly way, with the usual questions confirming who I was, where I lived, why I was there, my medical history of how my body came to be in such a sorry state. Then a little family history: illnesses and causes of death in the family, etc. All to be expected.

What was not expected was a detailed physical and mental assessment. First the physical: sit, stand without help, checking the level of movement of arms and legs, timing me to get out of the chair, go to the wall and touch it, then return and sit in the chair. Of course, I moved faster than I have for weeks to make a good show of it, but all the doctor said was: 8 seconds, that’s ok. I thought it was pretty slick. But there was more to come.

First, he gave me a pencil and a printed sheet: join the dots in the right order, redraw that cube and others. OK. Now I’m going to say 5 words. You repeat them after me. I’ll say them again and you repeat them again.  Then a little later, I’ll ask you to repeat the words. They were face, velvet, church, daisy, red.

1-IQ testHe then asked me to count backwards from 100 by 7s. Now, this is not something I do on a regular basis, but off I went subtracting and concentrating until I got to 65, when (thankfully) he stopped me.  It was a slow and stumbling performance. (I later asked my 40-year old son to do it, and he raced through the numbers without thinking – his kids do these backward counts all the time, instead of the old times tables we learned at school, and he picked it up from testing them. Not me.

Still recovering from putting in such a poor performance, he asked me to list as many words beginning with f that were not proper nouns (beginning with a capital F). I began like a racehorse, listing the fa’s (fat far fantasy, etc – even fart), then fe’s (feeble fear fellow, etc), the fi’s (fin finance fickle, etc,) then fo’s (fox fondle forest, etc). then fu’s (future fun full, etc. I left a couple of the more disreputable f-words out. I realised later that I left a lot of fr words, like frank frenzied friar, and even good old from.

But of course, that’s all very well when you are in the car leaving the car park. (The French have an expression for it: esprit d’escalier – spirit of stairs, or wit of the staircase: witty responses thought of only too late, on the way home.  Just like me.

Sitting in the back of my mind all through these tests was: do I remember the five words?  When will he ask, because I need a moment to think. Of course, the tests went relentlessly on for another 10 minutes. Then he asked: what are the five words?

1-memorygameMy mind immediately provided the first two: face and velvet, then nothing. He looked at me, I looked at him, then I looked at Julie (who smiled and looked away – thanks Julie!). Then he said I’ll give you two hints and if you still can’t remember, I’ll give you a multiple choice. I got two more with hints and the last with multiple choice. What I also got was a strong dose of humility.

But there was more to come.

In his very next sentence, he said he not only specialised in rehab/reconditioning, but also in Alzheimer’s disease. My immediate reaction was: SO? It was unspoken and followed (also silently) by When does this session end?? Let me out! I came for rehab, not embarrassment.

Fortunately, it ended shortly after. We were taken to the physiotherapy area and I was booked in the start next week.

I must admit I was a little peeved when we left (i’m a sensitive kind of guy), but Julie thought it was hilarious. After a while (and after testing a few friends) I have mellowed. Either we are all lining up for dementia or those results, under those conditions, for people who need “reconditioning”, are pretty normal.

Anyway, that’s what I reckon.

Ask me again in 10 weeks.

Road trip to Adelaide!

Julie has been commuting to her work in Adelaide a few days a week for more than a year now. So, for a change of pace, we decided to start our New Year by driving there together for a working holiday – she would work while I’d be on holiday!

There’s nothing as romantic as a road trip, where we could check out the delights of remote Victorian and South Australian country along the way. When you fly, you leave home, sit in a tube for an hour or so and you are there. On a road trip, the holiday starts as you pull out of your driveway. (more…)

Living well on dialysis? Absolutely!

BigDandMe is all about living well on dialysis.

Hard to imagine when we first hear the bad news: I’m going on dialysis. Then, our life seems to be consumed by shock, anger and not a little fear. But for most of us, that doesn’t last, because after a few weeks, we start to feel well again, and our resilient side comes to the fore. Our life is not over, just different. And dialysis is the price of the ride.

It is always great to hear of other BigD-ers with this living-life-to-the-full attitude.

 

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Wayne Cooper LSBM at DELA

Like Wayne Cooper, a board member of that wonderful South Australian institution, the Dialysis Escape Line Australia*. DELA’s main goal in life is to set up temporary dialysis units at resorts and on cruise ships to allow patients a holiday, without the stress and difficulties commonly experienced when organising treatment away from home. (more…)

Yet another !*?*?*! adventure?

This time the adventure began when I went to the toilet. When I looked at the result I saw a black mass surrounded by red wine that I don’t remember drinking. My heart fell: not good.  I thought, will I tell Julie and have to go back to that damned ED? Or will I just stay quiet and hope it is a one-off?

I flushed and began to walk away when I needed to go again.

Same result, with more red wine. Actually, all red wine.  Er Julie, have a look at this. She looked at me with just a touch of anxiety, looked into the bowl and said: Pack your hospital stuff, we’re going to Emergency, no arguments.

Blood transfusion Number 1

Blood transfusion Number 1

I hate it when I’m, right. (more…)

Another September medical adventure on dialysis

With my heartbeat restored to normal rhythm by those wonderful people at the Austin Emergency Department, life was sweet again.

Then on the evening of my third day back on BigD, about an hour into the run: crippling stomach pains. What the hell is this? Over the last few weeks, I’d had a niggling stomach ache, which I had attributed to a series of hotter than usual curries from my lunch shop. As you do.

red-curry-riceI’ve been losing weight lately, so I’ve taken to having a hot meal at lunchtime to try and beef up a little. I go to the same place most days, called ThreeAteThreee (‘cos it’s at 383 Camberwell Road, of course). It’s owned by a Chinese couple called Rick and Too-Shy-to-Say. Rick is a great cook. He makes a main meal every day: one day chicken, the next day beef. Usually, it is a curry (more…)

A call from home

1-home_is_where_the_heartI’m back home.  Well and truly.  And what a wonderful trip it was.  We spent nine days in Portugal (Lisbon and Cascais), two in Madrid and four in London, a total of 15 days.

My original plan for this post was to write a little about the trip and a lot about the dialysis experience: how it went, how I managed, what I liked, what I didn’t, what I would do differently, what may be useful when you plan your trip.  But life, in the form of a call from home, interrupted this plan.  It’s my internal top story, and it’s pushed dialysis aside. (more…)

Lisbon adventure #1

1-pickp-001Lisbon: we were having a ball.  Different, amazing buildings; windy, cobbled lanes; tiny yellow trams squeezing through cramped mediaeval streets, shops with never-seen-before stuff that’s hard to resist.  History at every turn.  And here comes one of those delightful No 28 trams.  Will we catch it?  Absolutely.  Where’s it going?  Who cares! (more…)

Off to the Diaverum Global Dialysis Conference

I’ve been missing in action for the last few weeks, for a couple of reasons.

Josie & Liam Firstly, our No.2 Son just married his lovely fiancé here in sunny Melbourne (on the beach at Elwood).  It was a great wedding, but they live in London, so Julie and I have been pretty busy preparing. Not much time for blogging.

(more…)

Christmas snippet

1-uncleHi all you BigD-ers and supporters.  Have a great Christmas!  I hope the day brings you joy and something nice to eat.  This post is just for Christmas.

This post is just for Christmas.

A Christmas Story

As part of my Christmas, earlier this week I had an interesting experience.  I went for my usual Christmas haircut at my usual barber.  The guy settling into the chair before me was an elderly gentleman who has owned one of the local coffee shops (more…)