Travel Dialysis Review site is up and running! (at last)

Front Screen

I have long thought we BigD-ers need a website where we could go for entering and reading simple reviews of holiday dialysis sites.

First, back in March last year, I thought, “Maybe I can build one!” So I had a go using WordPress Themeshop, after lots of emails from “helpful salespeople” but that was too complex. Then, in May I went to an online jobs site, where you pay experts to do this stuff for you. That was a waste of money. It took days to find someone who understood what I wanted and didn’t want the earth to do it. Once I chose someone, he was never available. It was not a good experience.

Swinburne University Community Collaboration

Finally, a friend told me about university community collaborations, where I could possibly work with IT students as part of their course, to help create and launch the site. I live close to Swinburne University, so I checked out the website, found the name of the Manager, Collaboration and Partnerships, and filled in the application form.

Sarah, the Manager, came back to me quickly, saying she was talking to relevant IT academics to see if this could fit as a student project.  After several meetings, the project got the go-ahead, as part of the IT Semester 2 course!  Winner!

Over the next five months, I met the students Matt, Angelo and Mitch, and their Supervisor, Janet. We had regular meetings, first to confirm the design and later to agree on how the system would look. They produced design documents, development and implementation plans and more. But most importantly, the developed the website.

Sample reviewsAnd it is beautiful to behold.

Once the Semester was over, they presented it to a range of Swinburne IT academics and their peers, to great acclaim.

1-Website Swinburne design Team

The magnificent Swinburne Development Team: (L to R) Supervisors Janet, Graham and Olga, students extraordinaire Matt, Mitch, Angelo and me soaking up the joy.

And they Invited me along, so I took photos, drank coffee and ate cake. To me, it was a double celebration: of their excellent coursework, of which they are justifiably proud and for BigD-ers around the world, the all-singing-all-dancing TravelDialysisReview website was born.


We uploaded the system in December, ready for release. However, it had no reviews, and it needed a few so that everyone could see how it all worked.

Then disaster.  I caught a bug and developed heart problems (as per my previous blog entries) and was admitted to hospital. TravelDialysisReview website progress ground to a halt. Until now, more than eight weeks later.

While I’m not 100% well, for the sake of expediency, I think it’s time I just put it up and made it available to all. I had hoped to have a few more reviews and maybe a couple of small training videos to show how it works, but they can wait.

Quick User Guide

In case you missed it at the top. the site address is:

1-Browse UnitsIf you want to find a review, you can search for the unit by city, suburb, country, unit name or address. If the unit has been registered, it will appear in a list. Click on the name and go to the review.


1-Add a unitIf the unit is not listed, you can record a new unit details (though you need to register first). Fill in as much as you can and leave any missing bits for others.


1-Add Review-001Once it’s recorded, you can enter a new review for the unit (you also need to be registered for this). Enter an overall rating out of 5, with side ratings for Comfort, Quality of Care, Cleanliness and Ease of Booking (also out of 5). You can click on each heading to get a quick summary of what you are rating.  Finally, add at least 20 characters about the unit.

That’s it.

Enter as many units and reviews as you like. Each new review appears at the bottom of the main screen after moderation. I promise moderation (checking for things that will get me sued) will be quick.

More soon.

Test Drivers Needed! (closed Tue 28 Nov)

Firstly, many, many thanks for your kind thoughts and good wishes. I very much appreciate them. And they must have worked, ‘cause I’m back!

I’ve been going on for some time now about how important it is for people on dialysis to travel if they can. Across the state or to a foreign country. Not only can it be a wonderful adventure, it can change your whole outlook: My life is not just what I do between dialysis runs, I’m a traveller, who dialyses every now and then between adventures. (more…)

Then there this: more shameful than inspirational

Again, I’m a little late to the party, (this aired in May)  but have you seen this story?

It is a truly shocking report. it confirms our worst fears: US dialysis is in crisis. The most expensive dialysis service in the world has the highest dialysis mortality rates.

Two for-profit giant companies (DaVita and Fresenius) deliver 70% of the care, overwork and underpay staff while making enormous profits. From this report, it is clear that the industry is overwhelmed by bad incentives, poor oversight, and profiteering.

Any wonder why over 70% of the fistula rupture stories on this blog are from US readers.

The one small light at the end of the tunnel is the California Dialysis staffing bill.

But first, have a look at the report (Language warning!).

Medscape has a great article about\ the California bill, (it’s free, but you may need to log in), that has attracted a huge number of comments, all in favor.

For example, one nurse wrote:

…The problem arises when you take care out of patient care.  By this, I  mean that the monetary value of running a clinic outweighs the quality of care provided by the staff.  You can not expect Staff to give the quality of care when they are overloaded with 4+ patients to care for and only have 15 minutes between each patient to rinse back, take VS, close up their access (be it a catheter or a access (graft or AV Fistula)) and put another patient on by doing their VS, quick assessment, cleanse their dialysis catheter/ graft/av fistula, start their treatment, document on the patient and give report to a charge nurse.

And another:

…I was tired of on-call and went to work in-center and my ratios in New Jersey were 3 patients per tech, nine patients/RN.  I had to assess 9 patients and put on 3 every shift and when you have techs they may put the patient on the wrong bath, not do vital signs timely, with no time between shifts if you had a patient hypotensive, it was insane.  A patient died on that unit, but not assigned to me that day because the techs did not do their vital signs and the nurse was busy doing something else. The B/P kept on dropping and no one assigned in that area ever told the nurse assigned there.  You still have to do care plans, monthly notes, give blood, give meds, and get yelled at because you are not doing turn over fast enough.

How the No boosters keep a straight face is beyond me.

One interesting thing from the video: when these companies are sued, they settle.

Food for thought for anyone who has had a loved one die from a fistula rupture in one of their units,

Road trip to Adelaide!

Julie has been commuting to her work in Adelaide a few days a week for more than a year now. So, for a change of pace, we decided to start our New Year by driving there together for a working holiday – she would work while I’d be on holiday!

There’s nothing as romantic as a road trip, where we could check out the delights of remote Victorian and South Australian country along the way. When you fly, you leave home, sit in a tube for an hour or so and you are there. On a road trip, the holiday starts as you pull out of your driveway. (more…)

International Travel Tips on BigD – an update

1-img_3565International travel is fabulous:  new worlds, new food, new language, new experiences, adventures and delights.

Of course, international travel can also be a little daunting. Once you step outside your door, your supports: your language, your local knowledge, your contacts, your comfort zone, disappear.  You are in the hands of others for the simplest of activities, from getting around, to eating, drinking, sleeping, going to the bathroom, and especially dialysis, because we all need our regular BigD fix, no matter what.

So preparation, planning and once you arrive, vigilance are the orders of the day(s). (more…)

Speaking of dialysis…

1-IMG_1532As I hoped, here is the video of my speech to the Diaverum Annual Conference at Cascais, Portugal, last month.  It was called: The View from the Chair, a Patient’s Perspective.

It covers a bit of ground, but the highlights (apart from the joke at the start!) are: (more…)

A call from home

1-home_is_where_the_heartI’m back home.  Well and truly.  And what a wonderful trip it was.  We spent nine days in Portugal (Lisbon and Cascais), two in Madrid and four in London, a total of 15 days.

My original plan for this post was to write a little about the trip and a lot about the dialysis experience: how it went, how I managed, what I liked, what I didn’t, what I would do differently, what may be useful when you plan your trip.  But life, in the form of a call from home, interrupted this plan.  It’s my internal top story, and it’s pushed dialysis aside. (more…)

Lisbon adventure #1

1-pickp-001Lisbon: we were having a ball.  Different, amazing buildings; windy, cobbled lanes; tiny yellow trams squeezing through cramped mediaeval streets, shops with never-seen-before stuff that’s hard to resist.  History at every turn.  And here comes one of those delightful No 28 trams.  Will we catch it?  Absolutely.  Where’s it going?  Who cares! (more…)

Off to the Diaverum Global Dialysis Conference

I’ve been missing in action for the last few weeks, for a couple of reasons.

Josie & Liam Firstly, our No.2 Son just married his lovely fiancé here in sunny Melbourne (on the beach at Elwood).  It was a great wedding, but they live in London, so Julie and I have been pretty busy preparing. Not much time for blogging.


Living life to the full on dialysis – Travel!

Over 70's Aust Cricket Team in whitesLiving a full life on dialysis is not just for a lucky few that somehow stay healthy and energetic between BigD runs.  It’s a state of mind.  Just because I dialyse doesn’t mean I can’t do things.  Simple things like getting out of the house for a while: going for a walk or a coffee with a friend, going to a movie or the football. or walking the dog.

Then for a little more adventure, maybe go somewhere out of town on a non-BigD day: to an art gallery or festival in the country, or a shopping trip somewhere new, or a boat or train trip to see the sights along the way, with a lunch or afternoon coffee as a reward when you arrive.  (more…)