The Big(D) questions: How to keep going; PD, HD or a transplant?

Last week was a big week for questions, and rather than answering them in the Comments area, it seems like a good idea to discuss some in a post.

First, Dan wrote:

Hi Greg, I’m 30 years old and I have PKD, I’ve had a transplant which unfortunately failed in January 2012. I spent a few months training to do haemo myself so I could do it at home (thinking that would make it much better) how wrong I was!  I’m not sure if it’s my age and the need to stay active but dialysis is driving me mad! I get very fidgety and agitated especially when I’m on the machine and sometimes I get so angry when I’m on there I just want to smash the bloody thing up! (more…)

Feeling good on dialysis after a setback

Getting fit on the BigD can be a challenge, especially in the early days or after surgery or some kind of other medical or physical setback.  But there’s only one way: slow and steady exercise, letting your body gradually build up condition.

It’s been about four months since I’ve been to the gym, and I started again yesterday.  What a shock.  Talk about the guy who gets sand kicked into his face.  What a wimp.  I strain with tiny, girlie-sized weights and pretend not to notice when tiny girls pick up the man-sized ones. (more…)

Dialysis is Like Life, Only More So

The BigD is the original moving feast. One month life is sweet: my brain functions Ok; puncturing is easy, with both buttonholes working; I feel fit and well; my blood pressure is like an athlete’s; my blood work is mostly within the zone; I am sleeping well; I can get out of bed, jog and exercise like I did way back when. On these days I think: “This dialysis is a soda – can I handle it or what?”

Then the next month arrives. Suddenly (more…)

Dialysis and getting rid of restless legs

One of the recurring hassles of kidney trouble and the BigD is jiggly or restless legs.

No one knows what causes restless legs. It could be in your DNA (susceptibility to restless legs can be identified as a marker when you get your genome read). It could be caused by whatever medical problem you have (like kidney failure). It may just arrive with middle age (like ear and nostril hair, and just as welcome). (more…)