Training really can stop people from dying from fistula bleeds

You may recall that in April last year, Julie Tondello (from Diaverum in Greensborough) and I developed a Fistula Safety training course and poster for dialysis patients. The main aim of this 10-minute course was to keep people safe from fistula ruptures and bleeds, both by knowing what to look out for to prevent it from happening and by Pressing and Lifting to stop the bleeding if it happened.

Julie ran the training as a one-on-one session for all patients at Greensborough and North Melbourne dialysis units. Surveys before and after indicated that it was universally well-received and effective.

But as always, the proof of the pudding is in the eating.

Peter

Peter, 70, has been on dialysis at Diaverum Diamond Valley for about 8 years, and over the last year, learned that he had contracted cancer. This led to a series of treatments, including chemotherapy.  Last month, he noticed a rash on both arms, which he (rightly) attributed to the chemo. His doctor recommended a cream rub, which he diligently applied to each arm, including before dialysis.

The trouble was that the cream made his skin a little slippery, and an hour into the run, the tape holding the arterial needle in place lifted off completely and his arterial blood hosed a couple of metres into the room. He immediately remembered his fistula safety training, pressed down on the needle hole with his finger and raised his arm. He stopped the bleeding, called for help. No panic, no drama.

Lilliana

Lilliana, 62, has been on dialysis for 14 years, eight of those at Diaverum North Melbourne. Over the last month or so, one particular needle hole in her fistula developed a scab that did not seem to be healing. While there was no sign of infection, nursing staff avoided it and chose other sites to puncture when needling. One morning two weeks ago, while Lilliana was at home, the scab came off and the fistula began to bleed profusely.

Again, like Peter, Lilliana remembered her training: she pressed with her finger and raised her arm above her heart to stop the bleeding, and called for help. She knew what to do, and she did it. No panic, no frantic search for a tourniquet or something to staunch the blood flow. Just quick, effective action. The ambulance arrived, she was taken to hospital where the wound was treated.

Over the next few days it showed signs of recovering.

 

1-north-melb-bleed-2

Lilliana’s fistula after the bleeding stopped

However, though the scab appeared to be healing, last week it came off again, while Lilliana was on dialysis. Blood burst out and sprayed everywhere. Once she realised what was happening, she again pressed her finger on it, raised her arm and called for help. The unit’s doctor quickly took over (see pic). Again, she went to hospital, but this time for a complete fistula rework.

 

It will take a few weeks for the fistula to recover, but it will, and in the interim, she will dialyse using a single needle.

The training works!

I must say, when we heard about how well both Peter and Lilliana responded to their fistula bleeds, everyone associated with the training were thrilled and delighted. Their prompt action diffused what could have been major, possibly life-threatening situations.

At the beginning of this project, our first surveys showed that almost no patient knew that a fistula could rupture or bleed out, and 90 per cent did not know what to do if it did happen.Post-training surveys indicated that over 90 per cent of patients now knew what to do. But seeing them put their training into action so confidently and effectively is concrete evidence that the training works.

Post-training surveys indicated that over 90 per cent of patients now know what to do. But seeing them put their training into action so confidently and effectively is concrete evidence that the training works.

We are making headway! In our own small circle, yes, but headway nonetheless. And having proven the effectiveness of the training, the next step is to release it for patients everywhere.

So watch this space. The training program will be available online over the next month or so, for any unit or anyone to download, print and use.

And, with luck, we will see what we have all been looking for for so long: as the training spreads, fewer and fewer people dying from fistula ruptures and bleed outs.

 

5 thoughts on “Training really can stop people from dying from fistula bleeds

  1. Thats a great piece of evidence, Greg, for all the Diaverum accreditation processes – National standard 1 and 2 And 9, as well as QMS. And I love the pre and post evaluation. Well done to you and the team and the learners

    Liked by 1 person

  2. It is simple procedure, but oftenly forgotten if patients are into panic. Training helps them to overcome panic and it saves huge amount of blood. Brilliant work! Kudos Diaverum!

    Liked by 1 person

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